About Wills & Power of Attorney with Your Unmarried Long-term Partner

Estate planning is necessary if you have a long-term partner but still no marriage certificate. Without it, none of you could inherit from the other, and neither one of you would have a say in the medical treatment provided to the other at the end of life.

If you die without a legal will, state law will determine where your solely held property will be distributed after your death, and it will not be distributed to an unmarried partner. If you don’t have offspring, your closest living relatives, maybe your parents, will receive your estate. In the same way, if you’re incapacitated, only your spouse or somebody you’ve named in a legal power of attorney may make medical choices for you. Fortunately, you can draught your legal documents.

Write your Wills

Another important reason to write wills if you have small children is to appoint a guardian for them. If neither parent can raise the children, the guardian will. In that case, the court would appoint a guardian for the child. Unless there was a severe difficulty with the person listed in the parents’ wills, the court would appoint that individual.

Estate planning is necessary if you have a long-term partner but still no marriage certificate. Without it, none of you could inherit from the other, and neither one of you would have a say in the medical treatment provided to the other at the end of life.

If you die without a legal will, state law will determine where your solely held property will be distributed after your death, and it will not be distributed to an unmarried partner. If you don’t have offspring, your closest living relatives, maybe your parents, will receive your estate. In the same way, if you’re incapacitated, only your spouse or somebody you’ve named in a legal power of attorney may make medical choices for you. Fortunately, you can draught your legal documents.

Living wills and Durable Power of Attorney

These contracts are required to provide your spouse with responsibility for medical and financial decisions if you are unable to decide on your own.

To grant each other responsible for your assets, employ durable powers of attorney (DPOA) for finances. If one of you is ever stricken by illness or injury, this can be quite beneficial. For example, you may require instant access to your partner’s banking account to pay the mortgage. If you don’t have a DPOA for finances, you’ll have to go to court to establish that your spouse is mentally ill and that you should have custody of his or her assets.

Make durable health-care powers of attorney to provide each other the ability to make medical choices for the other if you’re ever unable to do so on your own. Make a living will (medical directive) in addition to the DPOA, in which you explain your intentions for end-of-life health care as much as you like. Your physicians and other healthcare professionals must adhere to your requests, and writing them down lets your spouse know what you want.